Tag Archives: Harrodsburg Kentucky

Martha Kirby Bohon, Obituary

from The Sayings, Harrodsburg, Kentucky

Wednesday, March 18, 1896

Mrs. Martha Bohon, widow of the late Squire Ben F. Bohon, and sister of Mrs. Mary McFatridge and Mr. Abram Kirby, died, late last Friday night.  She was married forty years since and lived for many years in Woodford County, near Versailles.  More then twenty-six years ago she was summoned to the death-bed of her mother, Mrs. Francis Kirby, and then received an injury from a fall that so crippled her in her hips that never afterwards was she able to walk.  For more than fifty years she was a devoted member of the Presbyterian Church and a consecrated Christian.  She, during her long confinement, bore up with patience and resignation, and ever had a smile for the loved ones that so kindly and affectionately attended to her every want.  She was almost seventy-five years old at the time of her death and was ready and willing to go “where there is no sickness and the weary are at rest.”  The funeral was conducted Sunday afternoon, at the home of Mrs. Mary McFatridge, by Rev. J. G. Hunter, D.D., pastor of the First Presbyterian Church, and the interment was in the old family graveyard, in accordance with her own request.

Edward P. McFatridge, Obituary

from The Sayings, Harrodsburg, Kentucky

Wednesday, January 8, 1896

McFatridge

Mr. Edward P. McFatridge died suddenly, Tuesday morning about 9 o’clock, at his home about two miles from Harrodsburg, on the Louisville pike, the immediate cause of death being heart failure.  The deceased had been sick nearly three months, having contracted scarlet fever while nursing his children, who were afflicted with that disease, but as long as three weeks ago he seemed to be entirely recovered from the fever, though complaining more or less of being unwell at times.  Since Saturday last, he complained more than for some weeks previous, but was still able to get around his premises.  On the morning of his death, he went out to the smoke house, built a fire, walked back into his home, and immediately laid down, remarking to his wife that he felt very sick, and requesting her to call assistance if he did not immediately get better.  Mrs. McFatridge asked Mr. Clem Crane to assist her in attending her husband, but when they got to his bedside they found him suffering intensely with cramps.  Half an hour later he was dead.  He leaves a wife and three children, a mother, Mrs. Rebecca McFatridge, and a brother, Mr. Will S.  Mr. McFatridge was a son of Harvey and Rebecca McFatridge, and at the time of his death was forty-four years of age.  He married Miss Fannie Talbot, daughter of Mr. George Talbot, of McAfee, this county.  Two daughters and a son resulted from their union, the eldest of whom is eleven, and the youngest, five years.  The deceased was a kind and indulgent father.  Funeral services, conducted by Rev. W. B. McGartity, will be held at the Baptist church at 11 o’clock, tomorrow, Thursday, morning, after which the remains will be interred in Spring Hill Cemetery.

Richard Q. Davis

from The Sayings, Harrodsburg, Kentucky

Wednesday, July 15, 1896

From the Danville AdvocateRichard Q. Davis, one of the oldest and most highly respected men in Boyle County, died Saturday afternoon at his home on the Lexington turnpike, after a short illness.  The funeral was conducted at the residence this morning at 10 o’clock by Dr. E. M. Green, of the First Presbyterian Church, and a large procession of sorrowing friends followed the remains to the Danville Cemetery.  The deceased was eighty-seven years of age and a remarkably well-preserved man.  He was a native of Madison County, but moved to Boyle many years ago and has since been engaged in farming.  He leaves a widow, but no children.  “Uncle Dick,” as he was known to all, was a kind-hearted, generous and hospitable man, liked by his neighbors and admired by all his acquaintances.  He had done much good in the world and many persons besides his relatives and intimate friends have genuine cause for sorrow over his death.

Barney Vanbrike Brewer

from The Sayings, Harrodsburg, Kentucky

Wednesday, January 1, 1896

Mr. Barney Vanbrike Brewer, nearly 88 years old, died, Monday morning, 4:20 o’clock, at the home of his son, Mr. John W. Brewer, in this city.  For the last year, the old gentleman had been in declining health; and Thanksgiving day was taken very ill.  From this attack he had apparently recovered and Thursday, noon, went to the dining room and partook of a hearty meal.  A few hours later he was attacked by a stroke of paralysis from which he never rallied.  Mr. Brewer was born January 27, 1808, in Johnson County, Indiana, and at the age of six years, removed with his parents to Mercer County, Kentucky, where he spent a long, honorable and useful life.  In his early life he became a member of the Christian Church and lived up to his profession.  Industrious and frugal in his habits, he was generous and liberal in his acts of charity and was ever a willing contributor to the church of his choice.  He was married to Miss Margaret Tewmey, September 22, 1836; and eleven children blessed this union.  November 8, 1886, his estimable wife passed to her eternal rest.  Of all their children, only five survive their parents and are Messrs. John W., Garret and Thomas Brewer; Mrs. Ophelia Terhune and Mrs. Dora Perkins.  The funeral was conducted, yesterday, 2 o’clock p.m., at the Christian Church, by the pastor, Dr. C. K. Marshall; and the interment was in Spring Hill Cemetery.

Samuel L. Curry, Biography

from Mercer County, Kentucky – Biographies

Samuel L. Curry was born April 9, 1858, in Harrodsburg, Kentucky, and was the third of three sons and two daughters born to James A. and Elizabeth (Lewis) Curry.  James A. Curry was born in Harrodsburg, Kentucky, January 23, 1829.  He attended the schools of the town, but is principally self-educated.  He learned the tailor’s trade, but in 1855 entered the drug business at Harrodsburg.  In 1878 he located in Danville, Kentucky, and in 1883 he moved to Lexington, Kentucky, to become a member of the wholesale grocery firm of Curry, Howard and Murray.  He is a son of James Curry, who was born in Mercer County, Kentucky, March 25, 1797, and was a carpenter by trade.  He married Catherine Stagg, and to them were born and reared five sons and one daughter.  He was a soldier of 1812, and participated in the battle of New Orleans; his parents came from Virginia, and were among the early settlers of Mercer County.  He died at his work-bench, plane in hand, December 22, 1877.  Catherine Stagg was born in Pennsylvania, October 10, 1794; died at Harrodsburg, Kentucky, November 23, 1871.  The mother of Samuel L. was a daughter of Thomas P. and Arethusa (Yantis) Lewis, natives of Kentucky, and parents of three children, all daughters.  Samuel L. Curry was reared in Harrodsburg, educated at Centre College, Danville, graduated in the class of 1878 as A. B.  He was immediately taken into the firm of J. A. Curry and Sons, and continued in the drug business until the dissolution of the firm in January, 1883.  From Danville he went to Louisville, Kentucky, and, as a member of the firm of Curry and Dearing, engaged in the book and stationery business.  His health failing he sold his interest in March, 1885, and a short while thereafter accepted a position with Curry, Howard and Murray, at Lexington, which he held until his death July 7, 1886.  His life was one of singular purity; his every action directed by the nicest sense of honor.  His death was peculiarly distressing.  Overcome with heat while bathing, he went down within a few feet of his brother, who thought him only diving, and his body was not recovered until after two hours of diligent search.

Dr. William R. Evans, Biography

from Mercer County, Kentucky – Biographies

Dr. William R. Evans, a native of Mecklenburg County, Virginia, was born September 11, 1826, and is a son of Ludwell and Jane B. (Hardy) Evans, who came to Nicholas County, Kentucky, the same year.  In 1833 they moved to Mercer County, where Ludwell Evans died in 1874, aged eighty-three years, his wife having died several years previously, aged sixty-three.  Ludwell and his wife were of Welsh and English descent, respectively.  At the age of fifteen William R. Evans, having completed the courses commonly taught in the schools in the neighborhood of his father’s farm, entered Bacon College at Harrodsburg, Kentucky.  Having pursued the curriculum couse of that institution for two or three years, he began to read medicine with Drs. Scales and McBrayer of Harrodsburg,  He was a graduate from the medical department of the University of Louisville in 1850 and the following year was appointed assistant demonstrator of anatomy for the same institution and as such, with slight intermissions, served until the spring of 1855, also acting as private assistant to S. D. Gross, professor of surgery.  He followed his profession in the interior of the State for awhile, and in the winter of 1862, went to Philadelphia, and further pursued his studies under Professor Samuel D. Gross.  he resumed active practice in Louisville, but failing health led to his purchasing a farm in the vicinity of Danville, where he combined agriculture with his medical practice.  The doctor was a member of the Boyle County Association, and has served repeatedly as delegate to the American Medical Association.  He was married, October 18, 1855, to Mary J. Lee Forsythe, of Mercer County, daughter of Andrew and Narcissa (McAfee) Forsythe (see sketch of the Forsythe family elsewhere).  Four children have been born to the doctor and his wife, viz.:  Jennie Lee (now Mrs. J. S. Robinson), William L., Mary R. (now Mrs. C. T. Worthington) and Andrew F.  The family are members of the Christian Church.  In 1876 Dr. Evans removed to the city of Danville, his present place of residence, in order to avail himself of its superior educational advantages for his children.

William H. Riker, Biography

from Mercer County, Kentucky – Biographies

William H. Riker was born February 16, 1820.  His ancestors came from Holland and settled in New Jersey, which was the home of the family until about the year 1800.  Charles Riker, father of William H., was born in January, 1774, was a farmer, and in his twenty-sixth year came to the region of Kentucky, in which Mercer County lies, where he began life with no means.  He was married to Miss Mary Bonta, daughter of Samuel Bonta, a farmer of Mercer County.  Shortly after marriage he purchased fifty acres of land in what is now Boyle County; several years later he sold out, and very early in the present century purchased a tract of between 250 and 300 acres, one and a half miles from Harrodsburg, and at his death, in 1857, left an estate of about $30,000.  He was an invalid a great part of his life, suffering from white swelling, which caused him to use crutches.  The names of the children born to Mr. and Mrs. Riker are, Cynthia, who died in her twenty-second year; Samuel, who was a farmer of Mercer County (deceased); Diana, wife of J. H. Sutfield, of Mercer County, who removed to Missouri in 1842; Cornelius, a farmer of Mercer County, who died of cholera in 1850, and whose children live in Indiana; Ida, wife of John VanAnglen of Mercer County, her cousin who immigrated from New Jersey; Sally, wife of William S. Vanarsdall, a farmer of Mercer County; Charles, a saddler who died in Dover, Missouri; Jane, wife of Peter Davis, a hotel keeper of Bardstown, Kentucky, and afterward a farmer of Mercer County; William H. and James Harvey, twin brothers, the latter of whom is a farmer of Mercer County, living on a part of the old homestead.  Of this family Mrs. Vanarsdall, Mrs. Davis, James Harvey and William H. are now living.  The mother of William H. Riker, who during life was a member of the Presbyterian Church, departed this life in 1868, in the eighty-fourth year of her age.  W. H. Riker, a native of Mercer County, received only a business education in youth, and began selling goods early in life.  He formed a partnership, in 1845, with Joel P. Williams, deceased, under the firm name of Williams & Riker, and Mr. Riker began with a very limited capital.  They handled a stock of dry goods, and continued their business until 1847, when Nat Lafon purchased the interest of Mr. Williams, and the business was carried on under the firm name of Riker & Lafon.  In 1859 the firm erected a brick building, the one in which Mr. Riker now does business, and in 1863 Mr. Riker purchased the interest in the stock of dry goods and building, and continued the dry goods business with a capital of $10,000 on his own account.  In 1871 he took into the business with him, his nephew, William B. Davis, and in 1875 his son, W. Letcher Riker, was also admitted into the firm, and they have continued business under the firm name of W. H. Riker & Co.  Mr. Riker, on November 25, 1847, was united in marriage to Miss Martha D. Smedley, a daughter of John L. and Patsy (Letcher) Smedley, the former of Philadelphia, the latter of Mercer County.  John L. Smedley was a man of considerable prominence in the history of Mercer County, whose father was an Englishman who lived to the advanced age of one hundred and five.  Patsy Davis (Letcher) Smedley, his wife, who is still living, is the daughter of Stephen G. Letcher, a brother of ex-Governor Letcher, of Kentucky.  Mr. and Mrs. Riker had seven children, John (died in 1860 in his thirteenth year); Mary, wife of Camillus D. Thompson, of Harrodsburg; W. Letcher, married to Miss Fanny M. Simrall, of Covington; Patti, wife of John Lafon, of Harrodsburg; Sarah, wife of A. R. McKee, of Boyle County; Ida and Lafon.  Mr. and Mrs. Riker and their children are members of the Assembly Presbyterian Church.

Obituary of Martha Bohon

The Sayings, Harrodsburg, Kentucky

Wednesday, March 18, 1896

Mrs. Martha Bohon, widow of the late Squire Ben F. Bohon, and sister of Mrs. Mary McFatridge and Mr. Abram Kirby, died, late last Friday  night.  She was married forty years since and lived for many years in Woodford County, near Versailles.  More than twenty-six years ago, she was summoned to the death bed of her mother, Mrs. Francis Kirby, and then received an injury from a fall that so crippled her in her hips that never afterwards was she able to walk.  For more than fifty years she was a devoted member of the Presbyterian Church and a consecrated Christian.  She, during her long confinement, bore up with patience and resignation, and ever had a smile for the loved ones that so kindly and affectionately attended to her every want.  She was almost seventy-five years old at the time of her death and was ready and willing to go “where there is no sickness and the weary are at rest”.  The funeral was conducted Sunday afternoon, at the home of Mrs. Mary McFatridge, by Rev. J. G. Hunter, D.D., pastor of the First Presbyterian Church, and the interment was in the old family grave-yard, in accordance with her own request.

Sunday Afternoon Cemetery Tour

Note by Phyllis Brown:   This is my 200th post!  Thanks to all my subscribers and everyone who visits Kentucky Kindred!  I love sharing my genealogy adventures and information with everyone!  Now on to the next 200!

Sunday  Afternoon Cemetery Tour

Last Sunday our day was spent driving the backroads of Washington County, looking for small cemeteries and taking gravestone photos.  We actually follow maps since it is easy to get lost on the tiny roads – some that are so small it’s hard to meet an oncoming car!  At the rate the older stones are deteriorating it will be impossible to photograph all in the neighboring counties before they are unreadable.  This is an important part of our heritage.  No one should be forgotten.

I photographed all the stones at Hillsboro Church – many have been broken and removed!  This church is no longer used for services.  The sky was such a gorgeous blue!  At a cemetery at the corner of Coulter Road and Glenn Creek Lane the grass was waist high!  We will return in late fall and try to get better pictures.

We tried to find several other small cemeteries on our map, but with no luck.  As we were driving back to Harrodsburg  Ritchey asked if I had ever been to the Old Mud Meeting House, one of only two that have survived in Kentucky.  I had not.  Then he told me a cemetery was beside the meeting house.  I was excited, but not prepared for what we found.  This was a Dutch Reformed Church, established by 50 families who came to Mercer County from Pennsylvania in 1781.  There are 25 – count them – 25 Revolutionary War veterans buried in this cemetery!  The Sons of the American Revolution have placed plaques with their name, birth and death dates, the name of their regiment and their rank.

Many of the stones are in bad shape – lichens are destroying them little by little.  Erosion from the elements plays its part, too.  Both sides of this stone look alike – the writing has faded – time has taken its toll.

My goal is to get good pictures of each stone and each plaque; and draw a map of the placement of stones.  If not done now, in a few years most of the stones will be unreadable.

This is a fairly large cemetery, all old stones – with a few of the above ground monuments that were popular at one time.  A couple of these are crumbled and broken.  The Old Mud House is being restored to be viewed and enjoyed by future generations – the cemetery needs the same care – to be photographed and cataloged for posterity.  I will do everything I can to accomplish that goal!

Obituary of James Hughes Coleman

The Sayings, Harrodsburg, Kentucky

Saturday, February 20, 1897

Obituary of James Hughes Coleman

Mr. James Hughes Coleman died of consumption at his late residence on East Street, 9 o’clock at night, last Tuesday.  He had been an invalid for months and, fully aware of his condition, he was prepared for the inevitable.  To both Dr. W. P. Harvey and Rev. J. F. Williams, pastor of the Baptist Church, he expressed a willingness to die, trusting in the love and atonement of a merciful Savior.  Jim, as he was familiarly called by his host of friends, had many good virtues with his faults.  He was the youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Coleman and for years was associated with his father in the livery business.  As a driver and courteous
gentleman he had few superiors.  He sometimes drove like Jehu, but his judgment and experience were such that he never once experienced an accident.  Ten years ago he was married to Miss Emorme Gordan, the handsome and accomplished daughter of Mr. Samuel Gordon of Nicholasville.  His wife and two daughters, Catherine, aged seven, and Robin, two, survive him.  Had he lived until August he would have been thirty years old.  The funeral was conducted, Thursday afternoon, at the residence of his parents on Lexington Street, by Revs. J. F. Williams and J. G. Hunter and the interment was in Spring Hill Cemetery.  The Harrodsburg fire company, of which the deceased had been an active member, took charge of the funeral cortege and did honor to their deceased friend and comrade.  The large attendance at the funeral, while the rain was pouring down, evidenced the popularity of Mr. Coleman.